mindblowingscience
compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!
You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

sagansense

zerostatereflex:

Four Billion BCE: Battered Earth 

"No place on Earth was safe. Four billion years ago, during the Hadean eon, our Solar System was a dangerous shooting gallery of large and dangerous rocks and ice chunks."

(The gif above shows impacts over time: “Spatial distribution and sizes of craters formed on the early Earth. Each circle indicates the final estimated crater size; color coding indicates time of impact. Credit: Simone Marchi/SwRI.”)

thecrashcourse

thecrashcourse:

Humans and Energy: Crash Course World History 207

In which Stan Muller subs for John Green and teaches you about energy and humanity. Today we discuss the ideas put forth by Alfred Crosby in his book, Children of the Sun. Historically, almost all of the energy that humans use has been directly or indirectly generated by the sun, whether that be food energy from plants, wind energy, direct solar energy, or fossil fuels. Stan looks into these different sources, and talks about how humanity will continue to use energy in the future as populations grow and energy resources become more scarce.

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sagansense

sci-universe:

One of the nicknames given to Mars by the ancient Egyptians was sekded-ef em khetkhet, which means “who travels backwards,” a clear reference to its apparent retrograde motion. It was mysterious to the early observers, but with our current understanding we know that this retrograde motion is entirely an illusion caused by the Earth passing the slower moving Mars, which has a larger orbit.
Image credit: Cenk E. Tezel & Tunc Tezel
Animation credit: Eugene Alvin Villar

mindblowingscience
goingtofall:

For over 30 years the Forensic Anthropology Centre has used body farms for research and training. 
1.3 acres of land are used to study human decomposition under various circumstances. They study everything from the rate of bacterial decomposition to foreign organisms feeding on the body. All of this information is then used to help forensic anthropologists, pathologists, and crime scene investigators pinpoint time of death among other things.
There are about 5 ‘farms’ of this type in the country. 
You can make arrangements to have your body donated to the farm. 
(x) (x)

goingtofall:

For over 30 years the Forensic Anthropology Centre has used body farms for research and training. 

1.3 acres of land are used to study human decomposition under various circumstances. They study everything from the rate of bacterial decomposition to foreign organisms feeding on the body. All of this information is then used to help forensic anthropologists, pathologists, and crime scene investigators pinpoint time of death among other things.

There are about 5 ‘farms’ of this type in the country. 

You can make arrangements to have your body donated to the farm. 

(x) (x)

mindblowingscience

mindblowingscience:

'Wandering stones' of Death Valley explained

Ending a half-century of geological speculation, scientists have finally seen the process that causes rocks to move atop Racetrack Playa, a desert lake bed in the mountains above Death Valley, California. Researchers watched a pond freeze atop the playa, then break apart into sheets of ice that — blown by wind — shoved rocks across the lake bed.

Until now, no one has been able to explain why hundreds of rocks scoot unseen across the playa surface, creating trails behind them like children dragging sticks through the mud.

“It’s a delight to be involved in sorting out this kind of public mystery,” says Richard Norris, an oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, who led the research with his cousin James Norris, an engineer at Interwoof in Santa Barbara, California. The work was published on 27 August in PLoS ONE1.

Geologists previously speculated that some combination of wind, rain and ice would have a role. But few expected that the answer would involve ice as thin as windowpanes, pushed by light breezes rather than strong gales.

Continue Reading.